Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

To all our Australians friends ...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • To all our Australians friends ...

    I don't know if this is true or not, if it's old or not, but it's quite hilarious.
    May we all have a great weekend !!

    Sorin Solomon

    »»»»»
    In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
    -
    «««««

  • #2
    Re: To all our Australians friends ...

    It's Clarke and Dawe, a comedy duo. Funny, Clarke is a Kiwi, but I was never able to tell the Kiwis from the Aussies anyway so It's okay.
    Wesley David
    LinkedIn | Careers 2.0
    -------------------------------
    Microsoft Certifications: MCSE 2003 | MCSA:Messaging 2003 | MCITP:EA, SA, EST | MCTS: a'plenty | MCDST
    Vendor Neutral Certifications: CWNA
    Blog: www.TheNubbyAdmin.com || Twitter: @Nonapeptide || GTalk, Reader and Google+: [email protected] || Skype: Wesley.Nonapeptide
    Goofy kitten avatar photo from Troy Snow: flickr.com/photos/troysnow/

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: To all our Australians friends ...

      The spill indeed happened more than a year ago, August 18, 2007. Anyway, it's so funny

      Sorin Solomon

      »»»»»
      In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
      -
      «««««

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: To all our Australians friends ...

        Originally posted by Nonapeptide View Post
        Clarke is a Kiwi, but I was never able to tell the Kiwis from the Aussies anyway so It's okay.
        Oh you Canadians are funny people not being able to tell the difference between different nationalities.
        1 1 was a racehorse.
        2 2 was 1 2.
        1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
        2 2 1 1 2

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: To all our Australians friends ...

          Originally posted by biggles77 View Post
          Oh you Canadians are funny people not being able to tell the difference between different nationalities.
          I work with and have befriended a number of Australians and, according to them, Kiwis are rather unsavory individuals. Of course, The NZers say the same of Aussies. However, you both talk funny and have far too many sheep on your lands so that’s no skin off my nose. :P

          I got a grin out of hearing a Kiwi off-handedly refer to Australia as a small island off the coast of New Zealand.
          Wesley David
          LinkedIn | Careers 2.0
          -------------------------------
          Microsoft Certifications: MCSE 2003 | MCSA:Messaging 2003 | MCITP:EA, SA, EST | MCTS: a'plenty | MCDST
          Vendor Neutral Certifications: CWNA
          Blog: www.TheNubbyAdmin.com || Twitter: @Nonapeptide || GTalk, Reader and Google+: [email protected] || Skype: Wesley.Nonapeptide
          Goofy kitten avatar photo from Troy Snow: flickr.com/photos/troysnow/

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: To all our Australians friends ...

            Originally posted by biggles77 View Post
            Oh you Canadians are funny people not being able to tell the difference between different nationalities.
            I know it's crazy - New Zealander's accents are COMPLETELY different to Aussies'; closer to South African (but nothing like the same) than to Australian...


            Tom
            For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

            Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: To all our Australians friends ...

              I don't know if this is true or not, if it's old or not
              Yes, quite old & they intend to exagerate just a little with their satire.

              Clarke is a Kiwi, but I was never able to tell the Kiwis from the Aussies anyway so It's okay.
              We tend to "acquire" kiwis & call them our own if they have talent. Otherwise they are Kiwis. Kind of like how we claimed Mel Gibson is an Australian when he migrated here from the States when he was 6 or 7 & lived here for 20 years or something.

              But not telling them apart? To us Kiwis pronounce their "E's" as "I's" & their "I's" as "U's". For example, the following sentence "I have a can of Pepsi & Ten dollars Sixty Six Cents" sounds to Australians when they say it like "I hiv a ciern of Pipsi & Tin dollars suxty sux".

              To them I guess we just sound cool, ahah.

              I guess its like when we hear Canadians speak & we say "Oh! your from the States! " & they give you an evil look & immediately correct you.

              "We sound compleeeeeeetely different"...... yeah right. Maybe the Quebec part.


              have far too many sheep on your lands
              Yes, but they go well with Mint sauce so we give them a break.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: To all our Australians friends ...

                Originally posted by mobius2011 View Post
                "We sound compleeeeeeetely different"...... yeah right. Maybe the Quebec part.
                They don't actually sound compleeeeeeetely different from Americans. In fact, some folks from Minnesota, Wisconsin and the Dakotas sound the same as Canadians. It's has something to do with the Scandinavian roots... I guess Vikings talked funny?
                Wesley David
                LinkedIn | Careers 2.0
                -------------------------------
                Microsoft Certifications: MCSE 2003 | MCSA:Messaging 2003 | MCITP:EA, SA, EST | MCTS: a'plenty | MCDST
                Vendor Neutral Certifications: CWNA
                Blog: www.TheNubbyAdmin.com || Twitter: @Nonapeptide || GTalk, Reader and Google+: [email protected] || Skype: Wesley.Nonapeptide
                Goofy kitten avatar photo from Troy Snow: flickr.com/photos/troysnow/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: To all our Australians friends ...

                  They don't actually sound compleeeeeeetely different from Americans.
                  I guess when many outsiders hear a Canadian accent, they may mistake it for an American region. America seems to have many regional accents e.g. Mid Western, Texas Drawl, New Yorker (brooklyn?) accent, southerners, Cajuns.

                  I used to mistake it myself until working with some Americans & Canadians. Although "sounding" similar to American accents, they sounded to me a little flatter & less nasaly.

                  In Australia we seem to have only 2 regional accents. Those of the city & those of the bush which are often classed as "strine", best known outside Australia Strine accents were Steve Irwin & Paul Hogan.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: To all our Australians friends ...

                    Originally posted by mobius2011 View Post
                    I guess when many outsiders hear a Canadian accent, they may mistake it for an American region. America seems to have many regional accents e.g. Mid Western, Texas Drawl, New Yorker (brooklyn?) accent, southerners, Cajuns.
                    America has quite a few accents and sub-accents. The New York actually has several distinct accents: Brooklyn, Manhattan, Long Island are the major ones that come to mind. Boston and Chicago are two other cities known for distinct accents. New England has it's own interesting sound (Like Maine). There's several accents in the south; A Redneck/ Good Ol' boy accent (which, IMO, is just extreme laziness of speech), Genteel southern accent (very rarely heard these days. Think Scarlett O'Hara from Gone with the Wind), and a dirty southern accent which seems to be a mixture of the Redneck and the Genteel. Creole is really different from anything in America. We don't know much about them nor do they seem to mingle much with folks outside of the swamp. The northern states have a funny sound to them (Lots of Norwegians; Swedes particularly). It's not until you get to Colorado and further west that the accents mostly stop. Of course, the California Surfer Dude / Valley Girl is a legendary exception. Such a diverse land.


                    Originally posted by mobius2011 View Post
                    In Australia we seem to have only 2 regional accents. Those of the city & those of the bush which are often classed as "strine", best known outside Australia Strine accents were Steve Irwin & Paul Hogan.
                    I had heard that there were three Australian accents: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austral...ralian_English

                    Is the "Strine" accent like the Rednecks of Oz? "Throw another shrimp on that barby, mate!" *cough* Sorry.
                    Wesley David
                    LinkedIn | Careers 2.0
                    -------------------------------
                    Microsoft Certifications: MCSE 2003 | MCSA:Messaging 2003 | MCITP:EA, SA, EST | MCTS: a'plenty | MCDST
                    Vendor Neutral Certifications: CWNA
                    Blog: www.TheNubbyAdmin.com || Twitter: @Nonapeptide || GTalk, Reader and Google+: [email protected] || Skype: Wesley.Nonapeptide
                    Goofy kitten avatar photo from Troy Snow: flickr.com/photos/troysnow/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: To all our Australians friends ...

                      I had heard that there were three Australian accents: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austral...ralian_English
                      Ok, yeah looking at that list, from an Australians perspective, I would say the

                      "Cultivated Australian English " Is pretty much how the posh or very upper class speak.

                      "General Australian English " I agree, is how most people I know speak, being a city person all my life & yes is the same accent Nicole Kidman speaks with. Most news reporters/anchors speak in that accent.

                      "Broad Australian English " or Strine, like Steve Irwin, but not as much Paul Hogan.

                      Is the "Strine" accent like the Rednecks of Oz?
                      Personaly I would say yes. Although in todays politically correct western world, it would be argued that like in the USA its a bit too sterotypical to paint everyone with the same brush in country areas as predjudice or racially intollerant. After all there is probably 1 in 20000 that isnt a redneck, haha.

                      Throw another shrimp on that barby, mate!" *cough* Sorry
                      That was a phrase adopted in a tourism promotion starring Paul Hogan & pretty much makes any Australian cringe when we hear it. We call Shrimps "prawns", so it would be like Harrison Ford appearing in a TV ad in Australia promoting American tourism & saying "Come to America, Crikey its good here".

                      Although we do say barby & mate. Mate is used in nearly every sentence when males speak to each other here. Whether in friendship or agression.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: To all our Australians friends ...

                        Originally posted by mobius2011 View Post
                        Ok, yeah looking at that list, from an Australians perspective, I would say the

                        "Cultivated Australian English " Is pretty much how the posh or very upper class speak.

                        "General Australian English " I agree, is how most people I know speak, being a city person all my life & yes is the same accent Nicole Kidman speaks with. Most news reporters/anchors speak in that accent.

                        "Broad Australian English " or Strine, like Steve Irwin, but not as much Paul Hogan.
                        Was/is Paul Hogan's accent for real? It seems a bit over the top even for a clueless American like myself.


                        Originally posted by mobius2011 View Post
                        Personaly I would say yes. Although in todays politically correct western world, it would be argued that like in the USA its a bit too sterotypical to paint everyone with the same brush in country areas as predjudice or racially intollerant. After all there is probably 1 in 20000 that isnt a redneck, haha.
                        Actually, I was more referring to the the accent being redneck rather than the person's point of view being redneck. However, that assumes that you understand some rather subtle American culture concerning how we perceive certain accents within our borders. Someone can have a redneck point of view, a redneck accent, or both. Often a redneck accent will make a person assume that the owner of said accent also has a redneck POV ... and often that's true, but not always. I realize that you probably don't have quite the same grasp of those subtle perceptions so my question was rather stupid.


                        Originally posted by mobius2011 View Post
                        That was a phrase adopted in a tourism promotion starring Paul Hogan & pretty much makes any Australian cringe when we hear it. We call Shrimps "prawns", so it would be like Harrison Ford appearing in a TV ad in Australia promoting American tourism & saying "Come to America, Crikey its good here".

                        Although we do say barby & mate. Mate is used in nearly every sentence when males speak to each other here. Whether in friendship or agression.
                        I knew that about shrimp/prawns. Good analogy about an American equivalent. Also, I've been quite skeptical about the true prevalence of the word "crikey" in real Australian / British speech.

                        Accents have always fascinated me, and I like to think that I can make a decent mimic of a few of them. I have several Australian friends and know of one man who has such a thick accent (no idea what you would call it but its certainly not as soft as Nicole Kidman's) that it sounds like he's rolling marbles in his mouth (he may be from Queensland, if that means anything). I can do a decent job of faking the accent. However, South African accents totally befuddle me. There's a woman where I work that has the thickest SA accent I've ever heard. She makes Gary Player and Retief Goosen sound like Americans. I can't for the life of me figure out what makes that accent so charming and lyrical.

                        Then there's the Scots...
                        Wesley David
                        LinkedIn | Careers 2.0
                        -------------------------------
                        Microsoft Certifications: MCSE 2003 | MCSA:Messaging 2003 | MCITP:EA, SA, EST | MCTS: a'plenty | MCDST
                        Vendor Neutral Certifications: CWNA
                        Blog: www.TheNubbyAdmin.com || Twitter: @Nonapeptide || GTalk, Reader and Google+: [email protected] || Skype: Wesley.Nonapeptide
                        Goofy kitten avatar photo from Troy Snow: flickr.com/photos/troysnow/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: To all our Australians friends ...

                          Was/is Paul Hogan's accent for real?
                          I dont think so. We have kind of disowned him. He used to have a TV show called the Paul Hogan show - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGMSZ0KVOZc

                          That was when he made it big here & endeared himself to Australia. It was a bit of slapstick mixed with Benny Hill (dont know if you have heard of him, sexual overtones)

                          When Paul Hogan went into movies, he lost it for us & himself.

                          Someone can have a redneck point of view, a redneck accent, or both.
                          Ok, not quite sure about that.

                          Also, I've been quite skeptical about the true prevalence of the word "crikey" in real Australian / British speech.
                          It seemed to have been resurected by Steve Irwin (was). No one uses it but him & his family. We used to cringe as much hearing him say it as much as his wife who is Canadian.

                          I like the Scottish accent. I like the Irish accent & London accent. I can do northern England Geordie type accents well, as my wifes family are from there.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: To all our Australians friends ...

                            What about Kevin Bl00dy Wilson? A truer Australian provincial accent there never was... and if you can get past the swearing it's a great accent to listen to. I have mates who've moved out to far south eastern Australia (where Kevin's from) and they say the accent is pretty much all you'll hear down there

                            I too am like Nonapeptide; accents fascinate me and I can do some of them. Geordie, South African (well, a generic one), Aussie (like the one above), and one of those generic American newsreader accents (amongst others)


                            Tom
                            For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

                            Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: To all our Australians friends ...

                              Originally posted by mobius2011 View Post
                              I dont think so. We have kind of disowned him. [...] When Paul Hogan went into movies, he lost it for us & himself.
                              And now he's in a bit of hot water over some taxes...



                              Originally posted by mobius2011 View Post
                              It seemed to have been resurected by Steve Irwin (was). No one uses it but him & his family. We used to cringe as much hearing him say it as much as his wife who is Canadian.
                              Actually, his wife is American. Specifically from the state of Oregon in a city called Eugene. How do I know that? Other than Wikipedia, I heard about it whilst living in Oregon... a state that I spent most of my life in. I grew up in parts of Oregon not far from where she did.
                              Wesley David
                              LinkedIn | Careers 2.0
                              -------------------------------
                              Microsoft Certifications: MCSE 2003 | MCSA:Messaging 2003 | MCITP:EA, SA, EST | MCTS: a'plenty | MCDST
                              Vendor Neutral Certifications: CWNA
                              Blog: www.TheNubbyAdmin.com || Twitter: @Nonapeptide || GTalk, Reader and Google+: [email protected] || Skype: Wesley.Nonapeptide
                              Goofy kitten avatar photo from Troy Snow: flickr.com/photos/troysnow/

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X