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  • Asking for advice and/or consultation.

    Hello everyone,
    First of all I hope this is the right forum, could not see one that is more appropriate for this kind of thread.
    I just got released off the army (I live in Israel) and now it's the right time for me to start doing my way into the IT field which I always felt like i need to be in .
    I have a several years of experience with computers, mainly the hardware part of assembling computers up, nothing more than that really (well, the regular basics...).
    I am kinda confused, and not sure how things works, where to start, which path to go... networking, security, web devlopment, 3d moduling, etc etc... so many different directions... I am 21 years old and I don't want things to get late for me as I am not experienced and want to start studying A.S.A.P...
    I just hope I didn't get you more confused than I am , would like to hear your comments and of course I will reply to them and I might end this with knowing what I am going to do.
    P.S, I intentionally mentioned that I am from Israel, maybe things "works" differently around here, that's something I am not sure of either.

    Thank you very much, for now.

  • #2
    Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

    That is a dicision you'll need to make yourself.
    What do you like to do?
    Some people only like hardware, they go into hardware.
    It might starts simple with assembling a simple pc, but these people may grow out to implementing and designing new datacenters. Our EVA specialist is someone who started with relative simple things. But as always, you have to be really interested in the stuff you are doing. And that is something you need to feel yourself. IT is a very wide term. Project management is also IT, but those people are only into costs and numbers, while basically not knowing the difference between Exchange and Sharepoint.
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    • #3
      Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

      In my opinion start with CCNA and MCSE if you're in doubt and you're sure you don't want to go further into hardware.
      CCNA and MCSE are great for the basics. In my opinion there to many Microsoft engineers who don't know anything about networking and visa versa.

      Even if you want to go for security (like i'm doing) it's in my opinion necessary to do MCSE and CCNA.
      However you should decide where you want to go to. Still I think the above certifications are must haves.
      Marcel
      Technical Consultant
      Netherlands
      http://www.phetios.com
      http://blog.nessus.nl

      MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
      "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

      "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
      "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

        Hello,

        Originally posted by confusedmind View Post
        I am 21 years old and I don't want things to get late for me as I am not experienced and want to start studying A.S.A.P...
        The first step might be to relax. You are not going to be late, not everyone in this world knows what they want to do by 50 let alone 21. If you know then you are already ahead.

        IT is a field where people start at any age and leave at any age, experience in other fields doesn't hurt ones prospects in IT, it can actually add another dimension to your CV and skillset.

        Killerbee is right, you will have to find your niche; if you have a passion for a particular area/sphere then the next step for you will be to find it. Consider trying a few short-term positions doing a variety of different things in IT. It will all be good experience; you may actually find an exposure to multiple fields gives you greater versatility when you eventually focus on one area.

        I'd actually like to respectfully disagree with Dumber, don't dive into technical material until you know it is what you want to do and what area you want to do it in. If you really really want to start certification have a look at the Comptia A+, it is hardware based and you may already know it all! Then if it isn't what you want you won't have invested a huge amount either.
        I don't know anything about (you or your) computers.
        Research/test for yourself when listening to free advice.

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        • #5
          Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

          Originally posted by Maebe View Post
          I'd actually like to respectfully disagree with Dumber, don't dive into technical material until you know it is what you want to do and what area you want to do it in. If you really really want to start certification have a look at the Comptia A+, it is hardware based and you may already know it all! Then if it isn't what you want you won't have invested a huge amount either.
          Sure, you might disagree with me. However I've done A+ and found it pretty useless. I've learned more from my CCNA and my MCP's.
          Basic Microsoft en Cisco knowledge always become handy whatever you're going to do...
          If you want to go into networking, development, security, system administration, helpdesk or whatever.

          But hey, It's just my opinion and experience into this.
          Marcel
          Technical Consultant
          Netherlands
          http://www.phetios.com
          http://blog.nessus.nl

          MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
          "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

          "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
          "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

            Not to belittle it, but stay away from A+ unless you want to fix broken printers for a living.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

              I have to agree about A+ -- it is useful to build up confidence but is only an entry level. IMHO have a look at MCDST (2 exams) to move from HW to SW. You then have several paths open to you:
              1 more exam for MCTS - Vista Enterprise Support
              3 more exams for MCSA
              Tom Jones
              MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
              PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
              IT Trainer / Consultant
              Ossian Ltd
              Scotland

              ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

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              • #8
                Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

                dont feel bad bro, i had no clue what i wanted to do when i got started in the IT field. all i did prior was wait tables and bartend... 12 years worth of the hospitality industry.

                like you, i was well versed in hardware configs and basic OS configurations... i actually started out with a x386 a long time ago, and when i got my first x486DX2 (ooo. a separate math co processor! whee!) and had to make drivers for my games. this is back in the BBS days...

                so i got sick of food service and figured i would go back to skool. i had no clue for what...

                my pops suggested i go to skool for computer something because i was "good" at it. he thought i was, not me... he was a network admin for the DoH here in Florida, so i took his advice and turned out i was better at it than i thought. finished the 2 year in 1 and a half, then got a few certs.

                and all this happened at 26. im 30 now. so its not late, nor will it be too late.

                and i still havent decided what my specialty is.

                jack of all trades, master at none.
                its easier to beg forgiveness than ask permission.
                Give karma where karma is due...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

                  you need to decide what you want to do in IT - wrote code, administer systems, manage hardware, networking, QA, project management... lots of fields to go into. Once you decide, go for the best certs or degrees in the field.
                  ________
                  Yamaha Fzr400
                  Last edited by DYasny; 6th March 2011, 18:10.
                  Real stupidity always beats Artificial Intelligence (c) Terry Pratchett

                  BA (BM), RHCE, MCSE, DCSE, Linux+, Network+

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                  • #10
                    Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

                    Thank you all for the comments, I really appreciate the time and effort.
                    I think I will be going the MCSE way as a start, and I shall see how do I advance from there further, depends on my liking (Which isn't point-blank yet unfortunately).

                    Few things: As I mentioned above, I will be signing up a college and take a course for that.
                    * No previous experience is needed in order to start?
                    * Knowing that MCSE certification is windows server 2003 based and is out already for a few good years, and seeing that there are already upcoming Windows server 2008 courses for the new certifications (Which are named differently than "MCSE"), which ones should I be looking at? Wouldn't wanna stay outdated or anything like that (That's horrible! ).
                    P.S: Just to mention that it would probably take me by my calculations about 8 months to 10 months to complete it.

                    Thank you!
                    CM.
                    Last edited by confusedmind; 8th March 2008, 02:23.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

                      you can hope to complete it in 8-10 months but just a few pointers
                      1. you should think of finding a job that will start building experience up as you study. otherwise you might become what we call a pMCSE - paper MCSE, a guy who has a certificate, but doesn't know anything really. working during your studies might slow those down
                      2. I took my MCSE course at John Bryce in Israel (Daniel was actually teaching us there), and they promised it should take up to 10 months, but it ended up being around 14 months, because they couldn't fill the classes and kept delaying the courses
                      3. evaluate yourself correctly - you might be able to study on your own, and pass all exams. that should take up to 6 months at the longest, if you really study hard. and you will save lots of money
                      4. as good as certificates are, nothing beats a university degree. I have a BA in Business Management, not IT related at all, but the fact that I have high education behind me has helped me land almost every job I had in IT. Including my current job.
                      ________
                      TOYOTA AZ ENGINE
                      Last edited by DYasny; 6th March 2011, 18:10.
                      Real stupidity always beats Artificial Intelligence (c) Terry Pratchett

                      BA (BM), RHCE, MCSE, DCSE, Linux+, Network+

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

                        Thanks!

                        What about this:
                        * Knowing that MCSE certification is windows server 2003 based and is out already for a few good years, and seeing that there are already upcoming Windows server 2008 courses for the new certifications (Which are named differently than "MCSE"), which ones should I be looking at? Wouldn't wanna stay outdated or anything like that.
                        CM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

                          I think 2003 will be around for a while yet. NT 4.0 is still being used and it is now 12 years old. Look at 2003 and see if there is an upgrade path to 2008 or whatever the 2008 qualification is going to be. the study and work done on 2003 will not be wasted.

                          Alternatively you could look at Marcel's suggestion and try Cisco & a Security path. Security is and always (at least for the foreseeable future) will be an important/essential aspect of the Internet and networks.

                          The important thing is to start somewhere and get a job in the profession. Then you can see firsthand the various aspects and then make a better decission on what path you might like to take. you could easily spend 2 years exploring the different avenues before deciding on a path.
                          1 1 was a racehorse.
                          2 2 was 1 2.
                          1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                          2 2 1 1 2

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                          • #14
                            Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

                            the transition from 2000 to 2003 was VERY fast. might be the same with 2008, who knows?
                            although 2008 is too different, lots of windows admins (gui lovers ) are really against it, they don't want to use the cli
                            ________
                            Enzo ferrari history
                            Last edited by DYasny; 6th March 2011, 18:13.
                            Real stupidity always beats Artificial Intelligence (c) Terry Pratchett

                            BA (BM), RHCE, MCSE, DCSE, Linux+, Network+

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Asking for advice and/or consultation.

                              Originally posted by biggles77 View Post
                              Alternatively you could look at Marcel's suggestion and try Cisco & a Security path. Security is and always (at least for the foreseeable future) will be an important/essential aspect of the Internet and networks.
                              Having MCSE/MCSA and CCNA is always handy and not only for Security.
                              CCNA will give you more details about packets and how the packetflow goes.
                              Just like Warriors of the Net will give you some insight CCNA give you much more. Even if you want to be a programmer its handy to know how you're packets will flow across the network.
                              MCSA/MCSE give you more detail in Microsoft. See the example as above.
                              Marcel
                              Technical Consultant
                              Netherlands
                              http://www.phetios.com
                              http://blog.nessus.nl

                              MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
                              "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

                              "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
                              "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

                              Comment

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