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XP Firewall in a Corporate Environment

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  • XP Firewall in a Corporate Environment

    Is there any reason that you would want to run Windows Firewall in a corporate environment. We have a team that says it should be running and then I am part of another team that says no it should not.. Does the windows firewall provide something i am missing.

  • #2
    Re: XP Firewall in a Corporate Environment

    Properly configured it can be better than nothing. I've seen both sides of the argument but so far I would go down the path of having it enabled. It can be a pain sometimes though.
    cheers
    Andy

    Please read this before you post:


    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

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    • #3
      Re: XP Firewall in a Corporate Environment

      Anything that can help stop L users from messing up your network is a good thing. Considering you can centrally manage just about everything through GPOs (note, I said just about everything) then having the firewall enabled is perhaps not a bad thing. However a firewall is only one part of your defences. You should have a real firewall at the edge of the Internet cloud and then layered defences.

      Remember that there are 2 types of networks. Those that have been hacked and those that are going to be hacked. (Of course this statement could be made redundent by removing all users fro the network )
      1 1 was a racehorse.
      2 2 was 1 2.
      1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
      2 2 1 1 2

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      • #4
        Re: XP Firewall in a Corporate Environment

        At my work we have one of the most locked down and monitored networks I have ever seen. Web access of all kinds goes through ISA 2006 (and filtered using Websense) and then via NetCache arrays. Then there are hardware firewalls of several different makes protecting DMZs and the internal network from incoming traffic.

        We found that Windows Firewall was essentially a layer too far - even on laptops. Our VPN client (Checkpoint SecureClient - Thanks Dumber) does a certain amount of network policing on remotely homed laptops. We have not had a single case of network compromise with this setup; and the only virus infection was from a suspect email opened from a yahoo webmail page (the user no longer has access to webmail as they cannot be trusted). The infection was confined to the user's laptop because the VPN client blocked the virus' attempts at network access even on the LAN - and Trend Anti-Virus quarantined the infected file, and flagged it up to the admins.

        Personally, I don't think you need it... but it's down to how your organisation is set up; and what the business needs. It really should be a business decision taken by the CIO in consultation with the various affected Directors.
        Last edited by Stonelaughter; 22nd September 2008, 22:23.


        Tom
        For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

        Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

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        • #5
          Re: XP Firewall in a Corporate Environment

          This could be an interesting discussion because I think it might add a nice layer of security though your better off with the firewall from Vista (both inbound and outbound security)

          The main advantage is that you can block certain worms which uses random ports to push themselves over the network. Because XP is only blocking inbound traffic and not about traffic it can help.
          Also, when a client is off the network you can't manage attacks by potential hackers.

          At least, kind off...
          It won't help you against viruses from the web, it won't help you against viruses via email etc etc.
          The main disadvantage is quite hard to manage.

          Personally I wouldn't implement it, but I rather would focus on a good manageable AV environment and a good patch management solution.

          I also think you should talk why they are so focused on enabling the Windows firewall.
          Why are they thinking that this is so important to implement?


          @Stonelaughter,
          Why are you using securemote and not SecureClient?
          SecureClient has a build-in firewall which you can remotely manage which securemote doesn't have dough it's quite pricey
          I have to look it up again (long time ago I've done something with CP and their clients) but I'm pretty sure this is a huge difference
          Marcel
          Technical Consultant
          Netherlands
          http://www.phetios.com
          http://blog.nessus.nl

          MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
          "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

          "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
          "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

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          • #6
            Re: XP Firewall in a Corporate Environment

            SecureClient - that's the one! Thanks for correcting me. I used securemote about six years ago and never got used to calling it anything else. I did mention in my post that it does network policing... although I didn't know it was a fully-fledged firewall. (I'm not network skilled at all....)
            Last edited by Stonelaughter; 22nd September 2008, 22:24.


            Tom
            For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

            Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

            Comment

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