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xp home dont ping to xp proffsional

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  • xp home dont ping to xp proffsional

    i connect to os home and proffesional but i cant ping from one to the other i disable firewall on both of them what other problem can be

  • #2
    Maybe I'm wrong, but it might be because XP Home doesn't work with a domain. You have to connect it in a workgroup. If your other comps are in a domain, you won't get access to them from the home version, and it can't be accessed either.

    Kaisa

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Kaisa
      Maybe I'm wrong, but it might be because XP Home doesn't work with a domain. You have to connect it in a workgroup. If your other comps are in a domain, you won't get access to them from the home version, and it can't be accessed either.

      Kaisa
      OS should not have anything to do with not being able to ping a node on the network. Unless of course you consider the limitations of an OS by the marketing strategy set by a company in order to increase profits. In other words just because you have Windows XP home doesn't mean that you can not access network resources on a Windows NT domain. You simply have to find a way around that. I can and would love to explain more (and I will upon request) but I am short on time.

      The reply:
      The OSI model should be your number one resource for trouble shooting network issues. Sounds to me like you are having problems with the Transport layer. Meaning your protocols TCP/IP, IPX/SPX, NWLink, NetBIOS / NetBEUI, etc. Make sure you have the same protocols installed on both machines. Next are the protocols configured correctly? Are you on the same Local network? As simple as it may be I run into networks that use Static IPs that have totally different network addresses. Example:

      This network uses a Hub or a Switch on a TCP/IP based network. There is no WAN or Brodband ISP. There is also no Domain, this is a Peer-to-Peer network.

      Computer A. has an IP address of 168.192.254.3/16 (a result of AIPA a feature implemented in Windows 98, because DHCP is enabled (somehow) and a DHCP server is obviously unavailable)

      Computer B. has an IP address of 192.168.1.10/24 (a Static IP set by the admin when the network was first setup.)

      Not going to get much talking from "PC to PC" here unless that "Static Route" is in each system's routing table.

      Hopefully I can post more on this topic tomorrow. I am very tired and need me, my, sleep.

      Barak or Kaisa if either of you liked this "somewhat" informative post and I don't respond e-mail me, and I will try and finish this up.

      good night -_-
      Brad Bentley

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