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  • Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

    My computer (XP Pro) is on a domain for a company network. I want to join my home workgroup, but I know that if I try to rejoin the domain, I will likely not be able to without contacting the network administrator. I don't want to take a chance of losing my domain connection. I have heard of Mobile Net Switch. Can this be used without any risk of losing my domain connection? I am a novice to networking!

  • #2
    Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

    Does this have anything to do with Cisco Routers & Switches How-to ??

    Reported to admins to move to the correct forum

    Michael
    Michael Armstrong
    www.m80arm.co.uk
    MCITP: EA, MCTS, MCSE 2003, MCSA 2003: Messaging, CCA, VCP 3.5, 4, 5, VCAP5-DCD, VCAP5-DCA, ITIL, MCP, PGP Certified Technician

    ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points sigpic where appropriate **

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    • #3
      Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

      Sorry, I thought this was the Networking forum - where should this post?

      Thanks!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

        I would probably say Windows 2000 Pro / XP Pro forum. But just leave it. It has been reported and the MOD for this forum should be able to move it.

        Michael
        Michael Armstrong
        www.m80arm.co.uk
        MCITP: EA, MCTS, MCSE 2003, MCSA 2003: Messaging, CCA, VCP 3.5, 4, 5, VCAP5-DCD, VCAP5-DCA, ITIL, MCP, PGP Certified Technician

        ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points sigpic where appropriate **

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

          Originally posted by rsenck View Post
          My computer (XP Pro) is on a domain for a company network. I want to join my home workgroup, but I know that if I try to rejoin the domain, I will likely not be able to without contacting the network administrator. I don't want to take a chance of losing my domain connection. I have heard of Mobile Net Switch. Can this be used without any risk of losing my domain connection? I am a novice to networking!
          There is no "joining" a workgroup to be honest; it's not managed or controlled in any way and it's pretty meaningless as far as networking computers together goes, these days.

          I would certainly NOT recommend repeatedly joining and leaving a Domain - it's a lot more complex than the short list of instructions for the user would have you believe, modifying hundreds and hundreds of registry keys and setting up a secure relationship with the domain. Doing and undoing this over and over again will no doubt have unpredictable, and probably bad, consequences.

          Anyway - I have a laptop which is part of my employer's domain; and I have no trouble using my network at home for sharing files etc - I just have to authenticate first (which isn't an issue).


          Tom
          For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

          Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

            Assuming this is a laptop, why not just use the "Local Computer" option when at home and select the Domain from the pulldown list at the logon screen when at work.

            Screen shot can be supplied if the above it not clear.
            1 1 was a racehorse.
            2 2 was 1 2.
            1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
            2 2 1 1 2

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            • #7
              Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

              Hi,

              I am interested in trying your suggestion for sharing files, etc. I would like to not only share files, but use a printer on another computer in my workgroup. So, can you explain how I can 'authenticate first' to do this?

              Regards,

              rsenck



              Originally posted by Stonelaughter View Post
              There is no "joining" a workgroup to be honest; it's not managed or controlled in any way and it's pretty meaningless as far as networking computers together goes, these days.

              I would certainly NOT recommend repeatedly joining and leaving a Domain - it's a lot more complex than the short list of instructions for the user would have you believe, modifying hundreds and hundreds of registry keys and setting up a secure relationship with the domain. Doing and undoing this over and over again will no doubt have unpredictable, and probably bad, consequences.

              Anyway - I have a laptop which is part of my employer's domain; and I have no trouble using my network at home for sharing files etc - I just have to authenticate first (which isn't an issue).

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

                Hi,

                Yes, it is a laptop and yes, I would love to see a screen shot, or the steps for using "Local Computer" as I am not familiar with this approach at all! I don't seem to have that choice when I log on at boot up.

                Regards,

                rsenck


                Originally posted by biggles77 View Post
                Assuming this is a laptop, why not just use the "Local Computer" option when at home and select the Domain from the pulldown list at the logon screen when at work.

                Screen shot can be supplied if the above it not clear.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

                  1. When you log in, press the "Options" button to the lower right of the login screen. You should see a third box which currently contains the name of your work Domain. Click the down arrow to the right of this and you'll see "name <this computer>" somewhere. If you select this, you will not be logging into the Domain, you will be using a user name stored only on this computer. To do this, you will need to HAVE a user name on the local computer; ask your IT department to create one for you.

                  2. To "authenticate first" you will need to "Map a drive" to your home PC. While connected to your home network, in Windows Explorer, select "Tools...Map Network Drive". Select an appropriate drive letter not already in use at work or for physical drives. Then in the next box down, type the path to a shared folder on your home pc in the format \\name\sharename - where "name" is the name of your PC, and "sharename" is the share name of the shared folder. Tick the "Reconnect at Logon" box, and then when you log in with the same user name, it will always try to map this drive. Click on "different user name". In the box that pops up, in the "User name" box type "name\username", where "name" is the name of your home PC, and "username" is the user name you log into your PC with when you switch it on every day. Type the password you use for your home PC every day in the "Password" box. Click "OK". Click "Finish". A new drive will appear in Windows Explorer which allows you to browse the shared folder on your home PC.

                  Once this is done, make sure your printer on your home PC is "Shared". Then on your laptop click "Start...Run". Type "\\name" in the prompt; where "name" is the name of your home PC. Press return. A window will pop up showing your home pc's public content. One of the icons will be "Printers and Faxes". Double-click this, then double click your shared printer. An abbreviated "Add Printer" wizard will ask you a couple of easy questions, then you should click "Finish". You will now be able to print at home.


                  Tom
                  For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

                  Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

                    P.S. If you don't have/can't get/can't be bothered with a local user name on your laptop, just log in same as you do at work; assuming they haven't disabled "cached credentials" (which would be a really REALLY stupid thing to do) you will get in even though your domain server is not there, and will still be able to do everything in my previous essay.


                    Tom
                    For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

                    Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

                      A bit of information for you. By the way, in ALL of the following, a "User Account" is a list of information about a user which is held inside a computer. In order to use a user account, you must supply the NAME of the account (user name) and a password to prove that you have the RIGHT to use that user name. Once that is done, you are given access to that user account and its capabilities.

                      In the old days, centralised user control was an alien thing to Windows. Each computer had a list of users (mainly for convenience) and there was no security at all - cancelling the login screen would get you into the machine anyway, and everyone could access everything. Folders accessed from the network had passwords on them. One per folder. People stored shared files on their own machines and allowed people to access them simply by letting others know the password. Machines were loosely grouped into "Workgroups" which meant that when you listed the contents of the network, you would first see the contents of your workgroup. You could, however, click on the name of another workgroup and access the computers in there, too.

                      Then along came Windows NT 4 and the concept of "Security". A central server called a Domain Controller held the details of all the users in the organisation, and now folders and files had "access control lists" to say who could see and use them, which would refer to the Domain Controller's list of users. However, the designers recognised that the Domain would not always be available due to network constraints, so the computer would also keep its own list of users which could log in if the Domain was not visible (on a home network for instance or a dial-up connection) or if the computer was not functioning correctly on the Domain.

                      Certain users are always present on the computer's list; an "administrator" account which has full abilities to configure the machine as regards its own settings and its own little world; a "guest" account which allows almost anonymous but completely non-functional access to the computer (you might be able to write and save a text file and surf the internet somewhat but that's about it); and finally any accounts created deliberately by the "administrator" account - these would have the rights and capabilities given at the time of creation.

                      So - when you log into a machine, you can either log in with a Domain account whose information is stored in some server at work, or you can log in with an account created in the local computer's list. You just have to tell it which one you want. By the way - if you want to log in with a Domain account while you're at home, you MUST have logged into that account before, while at work. So - if you have four user names on your works domain but you only use three of them regularly, make sure that if you might need it that you log in with the fourth before you go home. Otherwise it will just complain and won't let you in.


                      Tom
                      For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

                      Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

                        Hi
                        Thank you for all of the detailed messages in this regard. Well, I have tried logging on in a local account (with full administrator access) and followed your suggestions, but when I try to map a network drive the system can not find my other networked computer files. I have provided the specific networked computer path and file name, following every step you have suggested. Also, I have made certain that I have shared the other computer's drives and printers and I know that works since I can see files and printers across each of those computers.

                        By the way, if I go into Network Neighborhood on my problem machine and look at Entire Network, I can only see the work server, but nothing else. I have three computers on my home network. The other two can see each other via a workgroup set up - no problem. My problem computer on the domain has no problem gaining internet access via my router - so I know that I am properly connected. But still, something is preventing me from seeing my other computers or their printers. And, of course, my other computers don't see my "domain" machine.

                        Many thanks in advance for any additional ideas!


                        Originally posted by Stonelaughter View Post
                        P.S. If you don't have/can't get/can't be bothered with a local user name on your laptop, just log in same as you do at work; assuming they haven't disabled "cached credentials" (which would be a really REALLY stupid thing to do) you will get in even though your domain server is not there, and will still be able to do everything in my previous essay.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

                          OK, time for more info.

                          -network address scheme
                          -OSes involved (are the all XP Pro?)
                          -details on steps took to access the computer (e.g. On box A connected to box B with username and password of user on box B etc.)
                          Regards,
                          Jeremy

                          Network Consultant/Engineer
                          Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
                          www.gma-cpa.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

                            I am not a pro at this, but here goes!

                            Network address scheme - Not quite sure what you mean. I have a home network set up with a Linksys router through which Internet access is achieved via a cable modem. My computers are wired to the router (via ethernet cables). The network is currently set up as a workgroup with networked computers configured as DHCP securing IP addresses viaTCP/IP.

                            OS's involved - There are three computers with different OS's

                            1. Dell Inspiron laptop running Windows 2000 - successfully on workgroup (i.e. file and printer sharing work).
                            2. Apple Mac desktop running OSX - successfully on workgroup.
                            3. My problem machine, a Dell Latitude laptop running XP Pro. It is on a work domain which I connect to remotely via VPN. It is configured such that if the network is not available, the machine still boots up allowing off network use with administrator rights. This machine is the one that is failing to see the home network.

                            Details on steps taken - I have taken the exact steps suggested by
                            Paul (Stonelaughter). So, I tried to map a network drive residing on my Inspiron onto my Latitude entering the the Inspiron computer name and drive path and adding the appropriate user name and password for that machine and receive an error "network path could not be found". I have tried to map a drive from the Apple with the same problem.

                            Hope this clarifies things a bit.


                            Originally posted by JeremyW View Post
                            OK, time for more info.

                            -network address scheme
                            -OSes involved (are the all XP Pro?)
                            -details on steps took to access the computer (e.g. On box A connected to box B with username and password of user on box B etc.)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Swiching Between a Domain and Workgroup

                              Yeah I think that gives me a better idea... of course I may ask some more questions.

                              Lets a) check for connectivity and b) make sure we're putting in the right computer name and share name.

                              a) Check for connectivity
                              1. Go to the 2000 machine, click Start -> Run -> type in cmd and press <Enter>
                              2. Type in ipconfig and press <Enter>. Note the IP Address listed.
                              3. Repeat step 1 except do it on the XP machine
                              4. Type in ping -a IP_Address. So if the IP Address you noted above was 192.168.0.100 then you would type in ping -a 192.168.0.100. Notice that when you use the -a switch it will resolve the computer name if it can.
                              5. If you get responses then ping by the computer name (i.e. ping computer_name)


                              b) Check the names
                              If can ping using the computer name then check to make sure you spelled the share name correctly.

                              Also, if you have a firewall program on the 2000 machine, make sure it's configured to allow traffic from the XP machine.

                              Others, please chime in with your thoughts because I'm not thinking real clear right now.
                              Regards,
                              Jeremy

                              Network Consultant/Engineer
                              Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
                              www.gma-cpa.com

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