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  • IP V6 Subnetting

    Hi Guys

    Does anyone know of a free site or video that teaches you IP V6 Subnetting?

    I used www.learntosubnet.com for my Ip V4 stuff & passing the 70-291 & after a nice free comprehensive one like that. Anyone know?

    Im about to do 70-649 & its one of the things Im curious about.

    M

  • #2
    Re: IP V6 Subnetting

    Does one need to subnet IP6? It was my understanding that IP6 generated enough IP addresses for each living human being to have 6 million addresses each - hence I don't really see a need to artificially increase the number available by subnetting.


    Tom
    For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

    Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: IP V6 Subnetting

      Incidentally, there is an article in Petri about IPV6 (First of the series).

      http://www.petri.com/introduction-ipv6-part-1.htm

      Also for some more info have a look at this:

      https://www.sixxs.net/wiki/Subnet

      Ta
      Caesar's cipher - 3

      ZKHQ BRX HYHQWXDOOB GHFLSKHU WKLV BRX ZLOO UHDOLVH LW ZDV D ZDVWH RI WLPH!

      SFX JNRS FC U6 MNGR

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      • #4
        Re: IP V6 Subnetting

        Incidentally, there is an article in Petri about IPV6 (First of the series).

        http://www.petri.com/introduction-ipv6-part-1.htm

        Also for some more info have a look at this:

        https://www.sixxs.net/wiki/Subnet

        Ta
        Thanks, thats given be a bit of a start, but there seems so many blanks to fill in that I still havent got my head around.

        I guess when the next part in that petri series will shed a little more light on it. Other sites I have seen are either over complicated, or I just dont get it.

        Ive seen some of the wiki ones, but many things there just still dont make sense, lol.

        For example:

        IPv6 addresses are normally written as eight groups of four hexadecimal digits, where each group is separated by a colon (. For example,
        2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334is a valid IPv6 address

        Why in so many examples that I see, does it start with "2001"?

        In that SixXs site it says

        "With IPv6 there is almost no need for a NAT, since the principle reason for a NAT in an IPv4 world is helping the available addresses go further. Instead of using NATs for your private network you will be allocated a subnet, which is accessible from the outside world (if your router permits). "

        I thought , the other main advantage of NAT was protecting your private network from being exposed to the public internet. Im still working out how that fits in.

        Then there is configuring an address on your network card.

        In IpV4 I know I have private ip ranges of

        10.0.0.0
        172.16.0.0 &
        192.168.0.0 to work with & can quickly work out various nodes in my network

        e.g. 192.168.0.2 for pc, 192.168.0.1 for router & can convey that to other techs in secs.

        How do i quickly identify & convey private ip's or internal ip's to other techs? Its a bit hard to rattle off FE80::20C:29FF:FE44:7E3F & expect someone to remember it unless it was written down.

        How do I configure the average network card quickly with a static ip?

        http://img.tomshardware.com/us/2007/.../26_ipv6_2.png

        Before hand with IpV4, I know I have a web server with 192.168.0.2 as an address, so cannot assign another node with that address.

        How with IpV6 can I quickly determine whether the static IPv6 I am about to assign is not allready in use?

        I guess with a lot more reading & practice it will become clear, but there doesnt appear to be any easy way of memorizing ip's in a large scale business environment where you are likely to have many nodes with static ip's.

        Am I missing something obvious?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: IP V6 Subnetting

          Well I also need to dive into it..
          Personally I'm thinking about to buy this book: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/books/4883.aspx
          Marcel
          Technical Consultant
          Netherlands
          http://www.phetios.com
          http://blog.nessus.nl

          MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
          "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

          "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
          "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: IP V6 Subnetting

            Originally posted by Stonelaughter View Post
            Does one need to subnet IP6? It was my understanding that IP6 generated enough IP addresses for each living human being to have 6 million addresses each - hence I don't really see a need to artificially increase the number available by subnetting.
            I just read that it was 3 Billion networks each. I wonder when they will run out?

            http://www.google.com.au/search?sour...ip6+subnetting
            Haven't checked any out yet. Don't see the need for IP6 yet since the internal IPs are not running out. If however you need hundreds of public IPs then I guess you need to do it.
            Last edited by biggles77; 8th January 2009, 19:46.
            1 1 was a racehorse.
            2 2 was 1 2.
            1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
            2 2 1 1 2

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: IP V6 Subnetting

              You're not missing much, so far I haven't read a single IPv6 article that does a good job explaining it.

              Why in so many examples that I see, does it start with "2001"?
              2001:db8::/32... is specially reserved ip just for use as an example in doumentation.

              I thought , the other main advantage of NAT was protecting your private network from being exposed to the public internet. Im still working out how that fits in.
              NATs main purpose was to reduce the number of public IPs you needed. The security benefit was just a side effect. You should never rely on NAT for security, use firewalls instead.

              How do i quickly identify & convey private ip's or internal ip's to other techs? Its a bit hard to rattle off FE80::20C:29FF:FE44:7E3F & expect someone to remember it unless it was written down.
              Its just going to be something you'll eventually memorize and be able to quickly identify the prefixes for global, unique-local, link-local addresses. Theres no easy way that I know of.

              How do I configure the average network card quickly with a static ip?
              For privite IPs you would use unique-local that would be fc00::/7 which becomes ???? as you see I have a lot to learn on this subject too.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: IP V6 Subnetting

                I think we all need to learn a lot of it.
                I was just happy that I finally could subnet IPv4 and now I've to start over again and learn IPv6.
                There are some some small documents about it like this: http://searchnetworking.techtarget.c...870277,00.html
                But after all, there isn't much t find yet.
                Marcel
                Technical Consultant
                Netherlands
                http://www.phetios.com
                http://blog.nessus.nl

                MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
                "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

                "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
                "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: IP V6 Subnetting

                  I think we all need to learn a lot of it.
                  Yeah, I just figure that while I dont use it right now, Im sure I will be in a year or 2, so might as well start demystifying it a bit now & learning some tricks.

                  Like pinging the loopback address with IPV6. I learnt that last night & its pretty cool & faster than IPV4

                  ping ::1


                  You're not missing much, so far I haven't read a single IPv6 article that does a good job explaining it.
                  Yeah, thats what Im finding. The link I provided in my OP for IPV4 starts of super basic with just binary & works its way up to advanced.

                  Every IPV6 article /tutorial Ive seen seems to start with the assumption, that your an intermediate user of it to begin with. Except maybe that Petri one, although even that, seems to jump past crucial information.


                  2001:db8::/32... is specially reserved ip just for use as an example in doumentation
                  Thanks heaps for that.

                  NATs main purpose was to reduce the number of public IPs you needed. The security benefit was just a side effect. You should never rely on NAT for security, use firewalls instead
                  .

                  I realise that about the original need for NAT, but its handy having that added layer of security knowing your ip is not exposed to the public. If there is human error & the firewall is turned off for some fix & forgotten to turn back on there is issues.

                  Whereas if NAT is not configured correctly, you will soon know about it. As things wont work at all.

                  For privite IPs you would use unique-local that would be fc00::/7 which becomes ???? as you see I have a lot to learn on this subject too
                  This is what I mean. Where do you start? You have an existing set of IPv4 addresses & you want to convert them to IPv6. Is there a simple conversion, or do you just make up a new set from scratch.

                  Does one need to subnet IP6?
                  They provide a blank space for you to put in the subnet mask. You still need network separation. Most are /64 it seems.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: IP V6 Subnetting

                    Well this one is going down quickly
                    http://www.potaroo.net/tools/ipv4/index.html
                    Marcel
                    Technical Consultant
                    Netherlands
                    http://www.phetios.com
                    http://blog.nessus.nl

                    MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
                    "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

                    "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
                    "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: IP V6 Subnetting

                      This is what I mean. Where do you start? You have an existing set of IPv4 addresses & you want to convert them to IPv6. Is there a simple conversion, or do you just make up a new set from scratch.
                      I've played with it in a lab before and I just used fc00::1/64, fc00::2/64... but these are unique-local addresses and not routable on the internet.

                      Theres no conversion but theres some transition services, google isatap, 6to4 and teredo.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: IP V6 Subnetting

                        Well this one is going down quickly
                        http://www.potaroo.net/tools/ipv4/index.html
                        Thats actually pretty cool. Ive seen the similar world clock

                        http://www.poodwaddle.com/clocks2.htm

                        But not an IPv4 one.


                        I've played with it in a lab before and I just used fc00::1/64, fc00::2/64
                        So, fc00 defines a local address?

                        theres some transition services, google isatap, 6to4 and teredo
                        Lol, had a quick look. Still doesnt make sense, haha.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: IP V6 Subnetting

                          The Loopback adress is about the only one I shall be able to remember.

                          0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 or ::1
                          1 1 was a racehorse.
                          2 2 was 1 2.
                          1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                          2 2 1 1 2

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: IP V6 Subnetting

                            Originally posted by Dumber View Post
                            Well I also need to dive into it..
                            Personally I'm thinking about to buy this book: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/books/4883.aspx
                            Dumber I have the 2nd edition of that book and its been no more helpful then what you can find on Google. Microsoft never does a good job explaining vendor neutral technologies.

                            Comment

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