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  • 6 Weeks for MCSE?

    Hi,

    Im about to be made redundant as a Prodution Technician, and as part of the redundancy consultaion, I could be getting a govenment grant for training to help me into another job.

    I am competant as a single user, as in I can install windows, build PC`s and generally get a PC to do what I need.

    I expressed that I would like to work in IT for my next job and the advisor suggested doing the MCSE as a full time six week course. A friend I knew a few years back started this with Coumputeach as home study course. I saw the ammount of work and it seems alot to do in six weks, even if it is full time. (Sadly, I have lost contact as he has moved from the area)

    So, my questions are...

    1-Is it REALLY feasable to go from "decent home pc user" to MCSE in 6 weeks?
    2-My course wont start for at least anothe 2 months, what can I do in this time to increase my relevent knowledge?
    3-Can anyone recommend books to read, or websites to visit?
    4-Any other advice?

    Many thanks, Paul.

  • #2
    Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

    1. HELL NO. The COURSE is 6 weeks, but you can't just pass the tests with ease after the class. It still takes personal study time and practice, and interest of course.

    Read sites like this, buy some books (perhaps ask the ones giving the class to recommend some books), and set up a lab at home.
    ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

      Someone with some experience in the field could probably do a bit over 1 exam a week and be done with an MCSE in 6 weeks...

      But someone who's a "user" right now...unless you have some kind of insane photographic memory and you can remember the whole books without fully understanding, I don't think so.

      Plus, I think it would be better to do courses 1 week at a time, practice, use what you've learned, do another one...

      Believe me when I say that if you cram it all in 6 weeks, you will forget everything..
      VCP on vSphere (4), MCITP:EA/DBA, MCTS:Blahblah

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

        I've taken and taught "MCSE in 2 Weeks" type bootcamps and the pressure is scary, even for experienced users.

        If you have no networking and server experience, dont bother with the 6 weeks, get some books and a technet+ subscription and practice breaking networks until you feel confident with the contents of the 70-270 and 70-290 exams, then get practice tests and give the exam a go.
        Tom Jones
        MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
        PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
        IT Trainer / Consultant
        Ossian Ltd
        Scotland

        ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

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        • #5
          Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

          yes 6 weeks will give you enough time to put your hands on compter and starting to understand the content more
          of course 6 weeks in not going to make you the master but you will open the door, and if you go to a CPLS you will be doing all the excercises step by step
          but if you are not using MOC , then its going to be bit hard to cram all the content

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

            Originally posted by Ossian View Post
            I've taken and taught "MCSE in 2 Weeks" type bootcamps and the pressure is scary, even for experienced users.

            If you have no networking and server experience, dont bother with the 6 weeks, get some books and a technet+ subscription and practice breaking networks until you feel confident with the contents of the 70-270 and 70-290 exams, then get practice tests and give the exam a go.
            2 weeks... this is not an MOC course, propably exam conecnt memo course ?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

              Actually it was customised MOCs but very fast paced -- no separate labs, about 8 sections per day plus a general lab session to practice all of it

              Prior experience was assumed, but not always there
              Tom Jones
              MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
              PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
              IT Trainer / Consultant
              Ossian Ltd
              Scotland

              ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

                Originally posted by Ossian View Post
                Actually it was customised MOCs but very fast paced -- no separate labs, about 8 sections per day plus a general lab session to practice all of it

                Prior experience was assumed, but not always there
                This is than only for experinced users and MOC with out labs means no good for me, as an MCT i believe putting the hands on pc and making pracs will make you the Master

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

                  Originally posted by PaulMCSE View Post
                  Hi,

                  Im about to be made redundant as a Prodution Technician, and as part of the redundancy consultaion, I could be getting a govenment grant for training to help me into another job.

                  I am competant as a single user, as in I can install windows, build PC`s and generally get a PC to do what I need.

                  I expressed that I would like to work in IT for my next job and the advisor suggested doing the MCSE as a full time six week course. A friend I knew a few years back started this with Coumputeach as home study course. I saw the ammount of work and it seems alot to do in six weks, even if it is full time. (Sadly, I have lost contact as he has moved from the area)

                  So, my questions are...

                  1-Is it REALLY feasable to go from "decent home pc user" to MCSE in 6 weeks?
                  2-My course wont start for at least anothe 2 months, what can I do in this time to increase my relevent knowledge?
                  3-Can anyone recommend books to read, or websites to visit?
                  4-Any other advice?

                  Many thanks, Paul.
                  Sorry to quote all your post paul, but it has gone a bit and wanted to make sure you knew that it was addressed at you.

                  With minimal knowledge, a 6 week course will do your head in. I did a 5 day Novell course several years ago and got information overload on day 4 mid afternoon. Happened again day 5, midday. As suggested above, see if you can spread the course out a bit so you get a rest between modules. In the meantime, get your brain fit by reading books on the various modules you will be taking and even try a Train Signal or 2 and see if they will help. Most impotant of all, create a network (virtual would probably be best), build, break and fix it until you at least know the basics backwards.

                  Books to read/study, Sybex (I can recommend), Microsoft Press (others have recommended) and possibly New Rider (I used them for NT4 but don't know what they are like now).

                  When you sit the exams just remember the answers are the Microsoft way of doing things and not real world solutions.
                  1 1 was a racehorse.
                  2 2 was 1 2.
                  1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                  2 2 1 1 2

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

                    Originally posted by biggles77 View Post
                    Sorry to quote all your post paul, but it has gone a bit and wanted to make sure you knew that it was addressed at you.
                    Hi,

                    Thanks for the comprehensive reply.

                    Its now looking like I probably wont be made redundant, so funding for this course is unlikely.

                    However, now that I have looked into it, I am exited to begin traing to change my career path into IT and would appriciate any guidance you could give me with regards to training for this whilst also working full time.

                    My local college offer MCSDT and A+ courses that I am thinking of doing (and funding myself)

                    Do you think these a worthwhile qualifications to get me on a decent career path (and decent pay)?

                    Paul

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

                      Decent pay......who knows. Depends on what you call decent. I left a very high 5 figure position 9 years ago for a very low 5 figure job so I could take my daughter to school and be there soon after she got home. The money was crap but time with a 5 year old more than compensated for the loss of $$$.

                      The idea is to get some good basic knowledge, get your foot in the door at a site (schools are a good place to start, pay is crap but the diversity of applications makes for a good learning ground and steep learning curve). Again I suggest Train Signal as they can be viewed in the comfort of you own home and you don't have to trot off to the local training center at funny hours (and crap weather).

                      Realise this is a long term learning process, basically the rest of your life as new software is released you need to learn it. With a lot of work you could be in a position where an entry level IT job is possible after 6 months. This does depend a lot on how quickly you pick up the various aspects of your new career path.

                      (Possible suggestion only) Depending on your chosen path I would get a good general knowledge of a wide variety of applications and then possibly specialise in one or 2 that take your interest. An example might be that you specialise in SBS Server.

                      For your Virtual Setup, get a reasonable system butmake sure you have LOTS of RAM. SBS 2008 for example needs 4GB to run in a virtual evironment (this I was told by a wise SBS MVP) and i would imagine it would run quite slow on this amount. On top of the 4GB for Virtual SBS you also need RAM for the Host O/S. Get a 64bit system so you can put 4GB or more and have it recognised without having the 32bit limitations. Acer Altos G330 MkII have a nice Server they flog to the schools here in OZ. Quad Core CPU, RAID 0, 1 & 10 and up to 8GB RAM, 2 x 750GB HDDs & 3 year warranty for about AUD$1,800. Of course you could build a a cheaper system for a less but it is all about options, what you want and what you can afford. Depending on your country, once you have a job in IT, training and equipment can be tax deductable items.

                      See if you can get a couple of quick certifications so it will help in your quest for a job. I haven't done A+ but I believe it gives good basic background for hardware knowledge so that could be one and either an O/S like XP or Vista or a Server related cert. Again I make note that this is only what I would consider doing and others will have different and possibly better ideas. As you will find out if you don't already know, IT offers an infinite (well it seems like it) variation of course/certificate combinations and options.

                      The longest journey begings with a single step and the sooner you take the step the sooner you get on your way.

                      Make sure you ask questions and remember (in most cases) there are not stupid questions except one and that is the one you don't ask because if you don't ask it, you won't get an answer. Also be prepared to make a lot of mistakes along the way. When you make one, admit it and learn from it. You will gain respect for not passing the blame and that can only help, so long as the mistake list is kept to a reasonable length.

                      Good luck.
                      1 1 was a racehorse.
                      2 2 was 1 2.
                      1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                      2 2 1 1 2

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

                        Have to agree with the previous posters, a 6 week MCSE is unrealistic for most people. Microsft recommend doing the 290/291/293/294 courses before doing any of the exams as there is a lot of overlap and building on previous learning. 291 (AKA The Beast as it is often referred to) can be 6 weeks in itself as there is a lot of stuff in there not necessarily MS specific like subnetting and routing protocols.

                        Going for 70-270 or 70-620 (XP or Vista desktop exams) are a good place to start and then love onto the server stuff later. A little experience goes a long way with the server exams.
                        BSc, MCSA: Server 2008, MCSE, MCSA: Messaging, MCTS
                        sigpic
                        Cruachan's Blog

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                        • #13
                          Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

                          Even if you could manage to study and take the exams in 6 weeks it doesn't mean you're going to get a job as a system administrator. A person with an MCSE and little experience would get a job on the help desk at my company.

                          Think of IT certifications like college degrees: You get a degree in accounting and your first job is accounts receivable clerk, not CFO.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

                            Agree with Joe. Maybe you're good enough to get the MCSE in six weeks - there must be SOMEONE out there who could do it - but how much use is it going to be?

                            People reading CVs and shortlisting for interviews look for 2 things; experience and qualifications. Usually (if they're not stupid) in that order. Without experience an MCSE will be useless to you - so you might as well look at COMPTIA's A+ and Microsoft's MCDST - both of these will be useful in gaining you an entry level IT position. With these two and the right company, you might even get to bypass the Service Desk and go straight into Desktop Support; but remember this is where your REAL learning will begin. Not only do you have to learn the job - you also have to learn the environment you're in, and remember that it will be completely different at every company you go to.

                            It's a difficult but very rewarding road that you're considering stepping onto - and I wish you the very best of luck.


                            Tom
                            For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

                            Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

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                            • #15
                              Re: 6 Weeks for MCSE?

                              Originally posted by Stonelaughter View Post
                              Agree with Joe. Maybe you're good enough to get the MCSE in six weeks - there must be SOMEONE out there who could do it
                              Like, for example, our very own Dumber?
                              Wesley David
                              LinkedIn | Careers 2.0
                              -------------------------------
                              Microsoft Certifications: MCSE 2003 | MCSA:Messaging 2003 | MCITP:EA, SA, EST | MCTS: a'plenty | MCDST
                              Vendor Neutral Certifications: CWNA
                              Blog: www.TheNubbyAdmin.com || Twitter: @Nonapeptide || GTalk, Reader and Google+: [email protected] || Skype: Wesley.Nonapeptide
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