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  • CCNA cert exam question

    I have heard the CCNA is divided into two parts and I have also had people discout that rumor. Has anyone taken the exam recently and can tell me what to expect as far as division, approx # of questions and length of time allowed for the exam, etc.
    Currently working towards CISSP
    Certified Network Specialist
    Security+ Certified
    MCP

  • #2
    Re: CCNA cert exam question

    Hi racerdeb,
    Thanks for the post!
    I believe that they are talking about how you can choose two different tracks to pursue the CCNA.

    With track I, you take a single exam- 640-801

    OR

    With track II, you take two exams-
    640-821 INTRO
    AND
    640-811 ICND

    For more info, checkout the Cisco CCNA certification website.

    According to Cisco's site, the 640-801 exam is 55-65 questions and you have up to 90 minutes to complete it. I have heard that there are simulation questions on the exam.

    As you learn more or have more questions, please post them here so we can all contribute and learn with you!

    Best of luck in your CCNA pursuit!
    -David Davis
    David Davis - Petri Forums Moderator & Video Training Author
    Train Signal - The Global Leader in IT Video Training
    TrainSignalTraining.com - Free IT Training Products
    Personal Websites: HappyRouter.com & VMwareVideos.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: CCNA cert exam question

      Thanks for the reply.

      I was just not sure if I should pause from MCSE-Security certification and back up and get the CCNA.

      It was required for a Network Specialist Certification to take the CCNA I, CCNA II, and FVDC. So I have spent some time on the Cisco side of the fence, but not officially certified. I have Certificates of Completion for those courses (passed all with perfect A+), but I am not confident that the training I received in 2003-2004 in the Cisco Academy will be enough to get me thru the CCNA 640-801 exam today. I know the material has changed. Some of what might have been covered in CCNA 3 & 4 are now considered basic for CCNA 1 & 2. I also have not programmed a router since the course work.

      How much of the CCNA Cert Exam is actual simulation of programming a router. The other stuff, I know I can drag out course material and refresh in order to pass.



      Any suggestions, guidance, or professional opinions are welcomed!!!
      Last edited by racerdeb; 15th August 2006, 03:48.
      Currently working towards CISSP
      Certified Network Specialist
      Security+ Certified
      MCP

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: CCNA cert exam question

        Hi racerdeb,

        Thanks for the post!

        I would never encourage someone to start a new certification track until they finish the one they are currently working on. In other words, if you are currently working on the MCSE Security, I would finish it first, then go on to Cisco certs.

        I wouldn't count on you being able to just go take the test, even though you did go through the Cisco academy. I suspect it would take you reading a CCNA exam prep guide and going through some cert prep questions to be able to pass the test (unless you have a lot better memory than I do). To me, the cert tests like CCNA ask so many memorization quetsions that you just have to have studied it recently. I think this would apply even if you used Cisco products every day. For example, maybe a question is "what is the port number for IMAP 3, IMAP 4, and NTP?". Well, most people don't have that memorized, even if you use a router every day.

        As far as how much is hands-on router commands- I can't say for sure as it has been a while since I took the exam and I know that stuff changes. I actually welcome some of the hands-on stuff as I think it is more like what I have experience in. I mean, I can put an IP address on an interface and enable it or set a serial port to a clockrate of 64k. If you are nervous about that kind of stuff, I would recommend a Cisco simulator, like the one's mentioned in this thread:
        http://forums.petri.com/showthread.php?t=9120
        I would especially recommend the Cisco press simulators. They are nice.

        If you have any more questions- feel free to post them! I am here to help.

        -David
        David Davis - Petri Forums Moderator & Video Training Author
        Train Signal - The Global Leader in IT Video Training
        TrainSignalTraining.com - Free IT Training Products
        Personal Websites: HappyRouter.com & VMwareVideos.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: CCNA cert exam question

          thanks for the input. I do have a pretty decent memory and I can program a router with the aid of my guide sheet for the first time or two that I do it. After that I can do it from memory, however, i f weeks or months go by before I use that knowledge again, then I'll pull out the trusty guide sheet to make sure I get it right.

          We were taught how to use notepad to pre-type out the commands and import them in, but again, it has been a good while since I've done that too.

          I guess I will stick with my original plan to get thru the MCSE-Security. I'd like to be able to get the 4 yrs hands on experience under my belt and go after the CISSP and C|EH.

          The CCNA exam was starting to worry me because job hunting in this neck of the woods is wanting you to be MCSE or MCSA before they will even consider your resume and some are wanting both CCNA and MCSE before you make it into their IT dept. Given those hurdles, I will be doing alot more prep work before I get placement.
          Currently working towards CISSP
          Certified Network Specialist
          Security+ Certified
          MCP

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: CCNA cert exam question

            Hi racerdeb,

            The more prep work the better. I think that achieving one before starting another is a good course.

            The MCSE & CCNA are good bases for anyone to start from. I think they both give you solid knowledge (as long as you get some hands-on experience in the process).

            It sounds like you have some good skills and documenting them would provide some proof of that to an employer.

            Thanks for posting!

            -David
            David Davis - Petri Forums Moderator & Video Training Author
            Train Signal - The Global Leader in IT Video Training
            TrainSignalTraining.com - Free IT Training Products
            Personal Websites: HappyRouter.com & VMwareVideos.com

            Comment

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