Office

Microsoft Switches Office 365 Groups to Private by Default

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Microsoft is switching the default access type for Office 365 Groups to be private. It’s a change that you can easily reverse, if you want it groups to be public. The change will be effective for Outlook endpoints first, meaning OWA, Outlook desktops, and the Outlook mobile apps. Later, the other Office 365 apps that create Office 365 Groups might fall into line. Or not, as the case might be.

SharePoint Online, Groups, Regional Settings, and Pacific Time

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Office 365 Groups are the reason why many SharePoint Online sites appear in tenants. If you’re on the Pacific coast of the U.S., the regional settings are OK. But anyone else in the rest of the world who uses the SharePoint browser interface will see times and dates in that instead of the local format. You can change the regional settings for a site, and now you can make sure that new sites have the right settings.

Creating a Simple Flow to Send OnDemand Notifications on Specific Documents

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Microsoft Flow integration in SharePoint Online provides a very simple way to model common collaboration scenarios, such as send an OnDemand notification when a specific document has been uploaded to a document library or a list item has been created in a list. In this article I will show you how to create a simple Flow to send an OnDemand notification when a document is selected in a document library.

Teams Splash

What You Need to Know About Teams and Office 365 Retention Policies

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With GDPR coming, it’s good news that Teams now supports Office 365 retention policies. You can apply retention to messages posted to channels and chats, or use a mixture of policies to target different sets of users and teams. You might be surprised how Teams has implemented retention – and remember, we’re only talking about messages – other content might also need a policy.

Why the Last Login Date Reported by the Get-MailboxStatistics Cmdlet is so Wrong

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The venerable Exchange Get-MailboxStatistics has been around for over ten years, but now it’s telling lies about Office 365 users. Well, just the last login date to their mailbox. The problem is that the world is a very different place to when Microsoft first introduced PowerShell in Exchange 2007. Mailboxes didn’t get so many visits from mailbox assistants then…

Excel with List of Office 365 Groups

Hiding Office 365 Groups Created by Teams from Exchange Clients

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Teams now hides the Office 365 Groups that it creates from Exchange clients (Outlook, OWA, and the mobile apps). That’s as it should be for groups created for new teams. If you want to hide groups created for older teams, you can run the Set-UnifiedGroup cmdlet, but that soon becomes boring when you might have hundreds of groups to process. PowerShell to the rescue once again.

Office 365 Groups Expiration

Why the Office 365 Group Expiration Policy Needs Help

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It is nice to have an Azure Active Directory Expiration Policy for Office 365 Groups, but it’s not so good that the policy functions exclusively based on age. Another problem is that administrators have no way of knowing when groups will expire. So we take out PowerShell, write a script, and hey presto, we have a report. We still need to solve the problem of creating a policy that functions based on activity rather than age, but that’s another day’s work.

PowerShell Office 365

Why PowerShell is a Core Skill for Office 365 Administrators

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PowerShell is a critical skill for Office 365 tenant administrators. A knowledge of PowerShell allows you to fix things that Microsoft leaves undone in apps like Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Teams. Sure, black holes exist for PowerShell (like Planner) and it is slow to process thousands of objects, but there’s nothing like a little script for getting things done.